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The Future of Christian Marriage explores how Christians find a mate within a faith that esteems marriage in a world that increasingly yawns at it. Drawing on interviews with nearly two hundred young-adult Christians from the U.S., Mexico, Spain, Poland, Russia, Lebanon, and Nigeria, Regnerus finds that marriage has become less of a foundation for a couple to build upon and more of a capstone. Meeting increasingly high expectations of marriage is difficult in a free market whose logic reaches deep into the home today. The result is endemic uncertainty, slowing relationship maturation, and stalling marriage. But plenty of Christians innovate, resist, and wed, and this book argues that the future of marriage will be a religious one.

"Offers a wide-ranging guide to where

we are now [and] could occasion some

thinking about where we want to be." 

The New Republic

Premarital Sex in America combines illuminating personal stories and comprehensive research to provide the fullest portrait ever produced of heterosexuality among young adults. Questioning stereotypes and unexamined assumptions, Regnerus and Uecker offer compelling—and often surprising—answers to important questions: How do the emotional aspects of sexual relations differ between men and women? What role does politics play in sexual relations? How have online dating and social networking sites affected the relationships of emerging adults? Why are young people waiting so much longer to marry?

"Clear prose and frank discussions make the book accessible . . . a shining example of  explorations of alternative explanations." 

Choice

Americans remain deeply ambivalent about teenage sexuality. Many presume that such uneasiness is rooted in religion. But how exactly does religion contribute to the formation of teenagers' sexual values and behavior? Merging analyses of national surveys and interviews with over 250 American teenagers, Regnerus reviews how young people learn—and what they know—about sex from their parents, schools, peers, and other sources. He examines what experiences teens profess to have had and how they make sense of these experiences in light of their own identities as religious, moral, and responsible persons.

 
 

"A magisterial study." 

Anthony Giddens

London School of Economics
 

Cheap Sex takes readers on a tour of the American mating market, highlighting young adults' frustrating returns on their relational investments and their failure to link future goals like marriage with how they navigate current relationships. From large nationally-representative surveys and 100 in-person interviews, a story emerges of social change, technological breakthroughs, and unintended consequences. Men and women have not fundamentally changed, but their unions have, and the emergence of "cheap sex" serves men's interests far more than women's.

"Offers a wide-ranging guide to where

we are now [and] could occasion some

thinking about where we want to be." 

The New Republic

Premarital Sex in America combines illuminating personal stories and comprehensive research to provide the fullest portrait ever produced of heterosexuality among young adults. Questioning stereotypes and unexamined assumptions, Regnerus and Uecker offer compelling—and often surprising—answers to important questions: How do the emotional aspects of sexual relations differ between men and women? What role does politics play in sexual relations? How have online dating and social networking sites affected the relationships of emerging adults? Why are young people waiting so much longer to marry?

"Clear prose and frank discussions make the book accessible . . . a shining example of  explorations of alternative explanations." 

Choice

Americans remain deeply ambivalent about teenage sexuality. Many presume that such uneasiness is rooted in religion. But how exactly does religion contribute to the formation of teenagers' sexual values and behavior? Merging analyses of national surveys and interviews with over 250 American teenagers, Regnerus reviews how young people learn—and what they know—about sex from their parents, schools, peers, and other sources. He examines what experiences teens profess to have had and how they make sense of these experiences in light of their own identities as religious, moral, and responsible persons.

© 2020 by Mark Regnerus